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Rand Paul, not a libertarian

Michael Tomasky: Rand Paul, not a libertarian: A real libertarian believes in abortion rights (government shouldn't control a woman's decision). A real libertarian thinks gay people should be able to do what they want and have equal rights. Paul is virulently against abortion rights.... He does not discuss gay rights on his web page, interestingly, but a sympathetic blogger late last year described his position as thus:
What the article doesn't specify is that the libertarian approach to the issue is to oppose "government sponsored" Gay Marriage. The distinction is hugely important.... They want to get married. Have at it. But why should the government be involved?
"Why should the government be involved?" is... really absurd here. The government has been involved in marriage for centuries.... [He doesn't] support ending the requirement that male-female couples go down to the courthouse and enroll and get blood tests.... As long as libertarianism keeps him on safe ground (bashing the UN and international alliances, say), he is one. But when need be, he's a religious conservative. A perfect amalgam of what the tea party movement is...

(Clipped from Delong.)

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I'm not a big politics junkie, so the first I heard of Rand Paul was when he was under fire for taking money from white supremacists. Needless to say, I'm not impressed.

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Yes, that will happen 100 years from now. I totally agree.

However, since I don't expect to live that long, I'm supporting government approved, old fashioned, marriage equality for same-sex couples.

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I don't think I'll be around in 20 years either, but my financial planner demands that I assume otherwise.

Realistically? Not for another 100 years. Really. It will take 20 years to get marriage equality passed, another 50 years for people to forget the struggle, and then 50 more years for people to roll around to the idea that marriage shouldn't be a state-approved thing.

Oh damn, that's 120 years!

You can get a better estimate if you do it in election cycles instead of years.

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